Standing for something builds respect, identity and confidence. It’s also the most effective way to create lasting change in the world.

Lacaton and Vassal stand for adaptive reuse.
Lacaton and Vassal stand for adaptive reuse.
mage by Jean-Pierre Dalbéra on Wikimedia Commons [edited & cropped]

In order to make change happen sometimes, instead of driving it, we simply need to be vulnerable, modelling it for others to follow. This is the action of a leader.

Image by Iain on Pexels [edited & cropped]


If you’re not taking the time to ask hard questions of your practice and answering them, you’re probably not advancing your practice.

Image by Albie Patacsil on Pexels [cropped]

No matter what anyone tells you, book covers and first impressions matter. We can nevertheless reframe their importance.

Image by Jimmy Chan on Pexels [edited]

Our identities are often tied up with our way of thinking. By rethinking our identities we begin to overcome habitual thinking that might be holding us back.

“I must not write on walls I must not write on walls…” Thoughts repeated over and over again reinforce instead of question the possibility of identity.
“I must not write on walls I must not write on walls…” Thoughts repeated over and over again reinforce instead of question the possibility of identity.
Image by Laker on Pexels [cropped & edited]

Change can be gradual or sudden. It is inevitable. So there’s a choice for architectural practice, be forced to change by the context in which you practice or choose to change into the practice you’d like to be.

Image by Taryn Elliott on Pexels [cropped & edited]

Without questions there can be no answers. Yet we’re often reluctant to ask questions because answering, or the answers, can be scary.

“When will you return?” it’s a poignant questions. It’s potentially also a hard one to answer.
“When will you return?” it’s a poignant questions. It’s potentially also a hard one to answer.
Image by NOHK on Pexels


Architectural practice is hard. The challenges are never ending and often for diminishing reward. It’s also the best job ever when it all works. So when practice isn’t working the way we’d like, how might we [re]start our architectural practice?

Image by Marlene Leppänen on Pexels [cropped & edited]

Architect’s voices are often too quiet to be heard despite having a lot to offer conversations on the common good. How might they rethink what that means and what they can do about it?

You have to put yourself out there to create a movement. Wave a flag. Stand out. Stand on the prow.
You have to put yourself out there to create a movement. Wave a flag. Stand out. Stand on the prow.
Image by Engin Akyurt on Pexels [edited]


If we’re to believe architects, the practice of architecture has a marketing problem. Their contention is that they’re not being heard, valued or acknowledged to the degree they might expect.

A glimpse of the top of a flat iron building. A little like the tip of the iceberg, with so much more out of the frame.
A glimpse of the top of a flat iron building. A little like the tip of the iceberg, with so much more out of the frame.
Image by PixaSquare on Pexels [cropped & edited]

Michael Lewarne

| Not inclined to stay inside the | lines.

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